Virtual machine applications - Most modern computers are powerful enough to run all operating systems in the main operating system, which means virtual machines are more common now than before. Here is a look at the five most popular virtual machine applications.

Virtual machines allow you to run an emulated operating system in another operating system. Your main OS can be Windows 7 64-bit, for example, but with enough memory and processing power, you can run Ubuntu and OS X side-by-side in it.

The Best of Virtual Machine Applications which you Should Know

Earlier this week we asked you to share your favorite virtual machine application, and now we are back to highlight the five most popular picks.

The Best of Virtual Machine Applications which you Should Know

1. VirtualBox (Windows / Mac / Linux, Free) EXPAND

VirtualBox has the following loyal thanks to the combination of price-free beer-like tags, cross-platform support, and a large number of features that make running and maintaining virtual machines easy.

The virtual machine description and parameters will be stored entirely in XML plain-text files for easy portability and easy sharing of folders. Its "Guest Additions" feature, available for Windows, Linux, and Solaris virtual machines, makes VirtualBox user friendly, allowing you to install software on virtual machines that provide extra privileges for host machines for tasks such as file sharing, drive sharing and peripherals, and more.

2. Parallels (Windows / Mac / Linux, $ 79,99) EXPAND

Although known for the Mac version of their virtual machine software, Parallels also runs virtualization on Windows and Linux. Parallels software offers a direct link, thanks to optimization on Intel and AMD chips, the host computer hardware with focus - when you selectively jump into a virtual machine to work the host machine automatically relinquishes processing power to it. Parallels also offers clipboard sharing and synchronization, shared folders, and transparent printers and peripheral support. Read more about Mac features here and the Windows / Linux features here.

3. VMware (Windows / Linux, Basic: Free, Premium: $ 189)

VMware for desktop users comes in two main flavors: VMware Player and VMware Workstation. VMware Player is a free solution intended for ordinary users who need to create and run virtual machines but don't need advanced enterprise-level solutions. VMware Workstation includes all the features of VMWare Player - easy creation of virtual machines, hardware optimization, driver-less guest OS printing and adding in the ability to clone machines, take multiple snapshots of guest OS, and test changes made to OS guests for software testing and recordings in a virtual machine. You can read more about VMware Player here and VMware Workstation here.

4. QEMU (Linux, Free) EXPAND

QEMU is a powerful virtualization tool for Linux machines built on the back of the KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine) system. QEMU executes guest code directly on the host hardware, can mimic machines across all types of hardware with dynamic translation, and supports auto-size virtual disks. Where QEMU really shines, especially among those who like to push virtualization limits and take their virtual machines with them, running on hosts without administrative access rights. Unlike almost every QEMU emulator out there does not require admin access to run, making it a perfect candidate to build portable virtual machine-based thumb-drives.

5. Windows Virtual PC (Windows, Free)

Compared to any other virtual machine-OS-under-the-sun application in this week's Hive Five, Windows Virtual PC is a benign offering. Windows Virtual PC exists only to emulate other-usually early-versions of Windows. If you need to run an application that only works under Windows XP or test software for backwards compatibility with Vista, you have closed the Windows Virtual Machine. This is limited, right, but for people who work in a strict Windows environment - and most of the world is still - that's the work done. Note: Virtual PC is availabls as Virtual PC 2004, Virtual PC 2007, and Windows Virtual PC, using this host and guest OS compatibility charts to find out which one suits your needs.

Virtual Machine 64 bit

Virtual machine 64 bit - The Virtual Machine allows you to run an operating system in the operating system, or run a virtual computer on the main computer. For example you have a Windows 10 PC, with a virtual machine you can install and run Ubuntu Linux in it virtually without having to dual-boot.

If you are a Windows user who wants to create a virtual machine (VM), whether for testing, making an isolated system, or trying a new OS without having to dual boot and damage the main OS, there are several software options that you can use.

The following is the best software for creating a Virtual Machine on 64-bit Windows:

Windows Hyper-V (Free, Pro Windows version and above)

Actually without using any additional software you can create a virtual machine on Windows using Hyper-V. It's just that this feature is available for Windows Pro version and above (64-bit), for Home or Single-Language versions not yet equipped with Hyper-V.

To use Windows Hyper-V, you need to activate the feature in Turn Windows features on or off. After that check Hyper-V. And after the process is complete you will find the Hyper-V Manager on your Windows.

Create Virtual Machine Windows 7

Create Virtual Machine Windows 7 - Run the VirtualBox application to start creating a new virtual machine.

Press the "New" button or select the Machine menu, then the New item to create a new guest machine. The Ctrl-N shortcut (press the control function key together with pressing the letter N on the keyboard) can also be used to create a new virtual machine.

Next comes the Create Virtual Machine pop-up window, which is useful for labels and types and versions of the guest operating system that will be installed.

In the Name field, write the name of the guest operating system to be installed, in this case Windows 7. The guest operating system name is also used as the folder name for the guest operating system file location (in Windows 7 the default virtual machine folder location is C: \ Users \ Account-Login \ VirtualBox VMs). In the Type section, select Windows 7 and in the Version section, adjusting the version of Windows 7 to be installed, whether 32-bit version or 64-bit version. Then press the Next button.

The screen then adjusts the amount of memory that will be allocated to the virtual machine in Megabytes. Automatically, VirtualBox will advise on memory allocation for the Windows 7 operating system to be installed is 192 MB.

If you want to make changes, the maximum fill is indicated by the green indicator or half of the total amount of computer memory available, so that the main operating system is not interrupted. Then press the Next button.

The next part is setting the storage media (hard disk) that will be used by the Windows 7 virtual machine. VirtualBox gives recommendations on the capacity of virtual hard disks to be made based on the type of operating system that was previously determined. We can replace the recommended hard disk capacity according to our needs.

In the settings of the virtual hard disk, there are 3 (three) options that can be used:
  1. Don't add a virtual hard drive: This option is used for advanced users, because the virtual hard disk will be created in a separate setting and after making a virtual machine Windows 7 is complete.
  2. Create a virtual hard drive now: This option is used to create a new virtual hard disk along with creating a Windows 7 virtual machine.
  3. Use an existing virtual hard drive: Use this option to select an existing virtual hard disk.

Select the option Create a virtual hard drive now because we will immediately create a virtual hard disk for the Windows 7 virtual machine. Then press the Create button.

The next screen to determine the type (extension) file of the virtual hard disk that will be created. By default VirtualBox uses the VDI (VirtualBox Disk Image) file format for virtual hard disk storage.

VirtualBox also supports reading file types from other virtual applications, such as VMDK (Virtual Machine Disk) which is a format of Vmware virtual applications, VHD (Virtual Hard Disk) format from Microsoft Virtual PC, HDD (Parallels Hard Disk) virtual application format from Parallels or the format of the QEMU virtual application.

After pressing the Next button, the next setting is to determine "how" the virtual hard disk to be created is stored on the physical hard disk (host hard disk).

In this section there are 2 (two) options to choose from:
  1. Dynamically allocated: This means that physical hard disk capacity will be used based on how much capacity the virtual hard disk has been used and not based on what size the virtual hard disk is determined. The capacity of virtual hard disks will be limited based on the specified size.
  2. Fixed size: This means that physical hard disk capacity will be used based on the size of the capacity of the virtual hard disk created, even though the capacity of the virtual hard disk is still empty or not used.

It is recommended to choose the Dynamically allocated option, then press the Next button.

The next screen is used to specify the name and the name of the folder where the virtual machine files will be created. We can also place virtual machine files into an existing folder or directory, or on another hard disk that is different from the hard disk used by the main operating system.

On this screen, we can also change the capacity of the virtual hard disk that will be made according to our needs. If in step 6 we choose the Dynamically allocated option, then we can make the size of a virtual hard disk up to 2 Terabytes, even though our physical hard drive (main) does not reach the size of 2 Terabytes. However, if our physical hard disk capacity is below 2 Terabytes, of course the capacity of the virtual hard disk can be used up to the maximum capacity of the remaining physical hard disk.

Press the Create button to create a Windows 7 virtual machine based on the settings that have been made.

Finish the process, on the left side of the VirtualBox application screen, a virtual machine Windows 7 will be displayed empty and ready to be installed.

The next step is to install on the Windows 7 virtual machine that we created. Double-click on the Windows 7 virtual machine or click the Start button (arrow icon) to run the Windows 7 virtual machine.

Because the virtual machine that we are running does not have an operating system, VirtualBox will automatically display a dialog box that is useful for selecting a disk drive that functions as a start-up.

Click the icon on the right to select the Windows 7 master.

Select the operating system master to use. The operating system master file format can be in the form of ISO, CDR or DMG. Double-click on the Windows 7 master file or click the Open button to close the file selection pop-up and return to the previous screen.

After that, click the Start button to start the Windows 7 virtual machine installation process.

For the next installation process, the steps and steps that will be carried out are the same as installing Windows 7 on a "real" computer.

Virtual Machine Windows 7 32 bit

Oracle VM VirtualBox or commonly called VirtualBox is a software product that is now being developed by Oracle (previously held by Sun Microsystems before being acquired by Oracle). This software serves to perform Windows 7 (32 bit) operating system virtualization.

Installation Preparation Before doing the installation process, of course we have to prepare some materials for the installation. The following materials for the installation process:
  • The Oracle VM Virtual Box application that is already installed.
  • Windows 7 master (32 bit) in .iso format
  • Run the VirtualBox application to start creating a new virtual machine.
  • Press the "New" button to create a new operating system.
  • Next comes the Create Virtual Machine pop-up window, which is useful for labels and types and versions of the operating system to be installed.
  • Select the type of Microsoft Windows operating system, then select the version of Windows 7 (32 bit). Then write the name for the operating system to be installed.
  • Then press the "Next" button.
  • The screen then adjusts the amount of memory that will be allocated to the virtual machine in Megabytes. Automatically, VirtualBox will provide memory allocation suggestions for the Windows 7 (32 bit) operating system.

If you want to make changes, the maximum fill is indicated by the green indicator or half of the total amount of computer memory available, so that the main operating system is not interrupted. Then press the "Continue" button.

The next part is setting up the hard disk that will be used by the Windows 7 32 bit virtual machine. VirtualBox gives recommendations on the capacity of virtual hard disks to be made based on the type of operating system that was previously determined. We can replace the recommended hard disk capacity according to our needs.

In the settings of the virtual hard disk, there are 3 (three) options that can be used:
  • Do not add virtual hard disk This option is used for advanced users, because virtual hard disks will be created in separate settings and after making a virtual machine Windows 7 is complete.
  • Create a virtual hard drive now This option is used to create a new virtual hard disk along with making a virtual machine Windows 7.
  • Use existing virtual hard disk files Use this option to select an existing virtual hard disk.
  • Select the option "Create a virtual hard drive now" because we will immediately create a virtual hard disk for the Windows 7 virtual machine. Then press the "Create" button.
  • The next screen is to determine the file type of the virtual hard disk that will be created. By default VirtualBox uses the VDI (VirtualBox Disk Image) file format for virtual hard disk storage.

VirtualBox also supports reading file types from other virtual applications, such as VMDK (Virtual Machine Disk) format from Vmware virtual application, VHD (Virtual Hard Disk) format from Microsoft Virtual PC, HDD (Parallels Hard Disk) virtual application format from Parallels or format of the QEMU virtual application.

After pressing the Next button, the next setting is to determine "how" the virtual hard disk to be created is stored on the physical hard disk (host hard disk). There are 2 options available in this section. It is recommended to choose the option "Allocated dynamically", then press the "Continue" button.

The next screen is used to specify the name and the name of the folder where the virtual machine files will be created. We can also place virtual machine files into an existing folder or directory, or on another hard disk that is different from the hard disk used by the main operating system.

On this screen, we can also change the capacity of the virtual hard disk that will be made according to our needs. If in step 6 we choose the option "Allocated dynamically", then we can make the size of virtual hard disk up to 2 Terabytes, even though our physical hard drive (main) does not reach the size of 2 Terabytes. However, if our physical hard disk capacity is below 2 Terabytes, of course the capacity of the virtual hard disk can be used up to the maximum capacity of the remaining physical hard disk.

Press the "Create" button to create a Windows 7 32 bit virtual machine based on the settings that have been made. After the process is complete, on the left side of the VirtualBox application screen, a virtual machine will be displayed, Windows 7 is empty and ready to install.

VirtualBox is a powerful x86 and AMD64/Intel64 virtualization product for enterprise as well as home use. Not only is VirtualBox an extremely feature rich, high performance product for enterprise customers, it is also the only professional solution that is freely available as Open Source Software under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 2. See "About VirtualBox" for an introduction.

Presently, VirtualBox runs on Windows, Linux, Macintosh, and Solaris hosts and supports a large number of guest operating systems including but not limited to Windows (NT 4.0, 2000, XP, Server 2003, Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 10), DOS/Windows 3.x, Linux (2.4, 2.6, 3.x and 4.x), Solaris and OpenSolaris, OS/2, and OpenBSD.

VirtualBox is being actively developed with frequent releases and has an ever growing list of features, supported guest operating systems and platforms it runs on. VirtualBox is a community effort backed by a dedicated company: everyone is encouraged to contribute while Oracle ensures the product always meets professional quality criteria.